Rome and Constantinople: Rewriting Roman History During Late Antiquity

Rome and Constantinople Rewriting Roman History During Late Antiquity Imperial Rome and Christian Constantinople were both astonishingly large cities with over sized appetites that served as potent symbols of the Roman Empire and its rulers Esteemed historian Raymond Va

  • Title: Rome and Constantinople: Rewriting Roman History During Late Antiquity
  • Author: Raymond Van Dam
  • ISBN: 9781602582019
  • Page: 406
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Imperial Rome and Christian Constantinople were both astonishingly large cities with over sized appetites that served as potent symbols of the Roman Empire and its rulers Esteemed historian Raymond Van Dam draws upon a wide array of evidence to reveal a deep interdependence on imperial ideology and economy as he elucidates the parallel workaday realities and lofty imagesImperial Rome and Christian Constantinople were both astonishingly large cities with over sized appetites that served as potent symbols of the Roman Empire and its rulers Esteemed historian Raymond Van Dam draws upon a wide array of evidence to reveal a deep interdependence on imperial ideology and economy as he elucidates the parallel workaday realities and lofty images in their stories.Tracing the arc of empire from the Rome of Augustus to Justinian s Constantinople, he masterfully shows how the changing political structures, ideologies, and historical narratives of Old and New Rome always remained rooted in the bedrock of the ancient Mediterranean s economic and demographic realities The transformations in the Late Roman Empire, brought about by the rise of the military and the church, required a rewriting of the master narrative of history and signaled changes in economic systems Just as Old Rome had provided a stage set for the performance of Republican emperorship, New Rome was configured for the celebration of Christian rule As it came to pass, a city with too much history was outshone by a city with no history Provided with the urban amenities and an imagined history appropriate to its elevated status, Constantinople could thus resonate as the new imperial capital, while Rome, on the other hand, was reinvented as the papal city.

    • Free Read [Business Book] ☆ Rome and Constantinople: Rewriting Roman History During Late Antiquity - by Raymond Van Dam ↠
      406 Raymond Van Dam
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Business Book] ☆ Rome and Constantinople: Rewriting Roman History During Late Antiquity - by Raymond Van Dam ↠
      Posted by:Raymond Van Dam
      Published :2019-08-13T01:15:32+00:00

    About “Raymond Van Dam

    • Raymond Van Dam

      Raymond Van Dam Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Rome and Constantinople: Rewriting Roman History During Late Antiquity book, this is one of the most wanted Raymond Van Dam author readers around the world.

    138 thoughts on “Rome and Constantinople: Rewriting Roman History During Late Antiquity

    • Raymond Van Dam masterfully sketches out how two of the greatest cities of the later Roman Empire, Rome and Constantinople affected emperorship, imperial ideology, and history writing and how they in turn affected the cities. The central premise of this book is that imperial history had to be re-written at the end of antiquity. The city of Rome had a long and glorious heritage, but no longer looked the part as it was depopulated and falling into ruin. The city of Constantinople, on the other han [...]


    • A good but rather superficial overview of the significance of Rome and Constantinople as the capitals of the Roman Empire.Not free of annoying errors such as: "And since Valens never visited Rome, he could also learn about the original capital of his empire." Valens was the emperor of the eastern part of the Empire, so his capital was Constantinople. He had no affairs in Rome, where his brother Valentinian I ruled the western part of the Empire.



    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *