Rochdale Village: Robert Moses, 6,000 Families, and New York City's Great Experiment in Integrated Housing

Rochdale Village Robert Moses Families and New York City s Great Experiment in Integrated Housing From to roughly families moved into Rochdale Village at the time the world s largest housing cooperative in southeastern Queens New York The moderate income cooperative attracted fa

  • Title: Rochdale Village: Robert Moses, 6,000 Families, and New York City's Great Experiment in Integrated Housing
  • Author: Peter Eisenstadt
  • ISBN: 9780801448782
  • Page: 431
  • Format: Hardcover
  • From 1963 to 1965 roughly 6,000 families moved into Rochdale Village, at the time the world s largest housing cooperative, in southeastern Queens, New York The moderate income cooperative attracted families from a diverse background, white and black, to what was a predominantly black neighborhood In its early years, Rochdale was widely hailed as one of the few successfulFrom 1963 to 1965 roughly 6,000 families moved into Rochdale Village, at the time the world s largest housing cooperative, in southeastern Queens, New York The moderate income cooperative attracted families from a diverse background, white and black, to what was a predominantly black neighborhood In its early years, Rochdale was widely hailed as one of the few successful large scale efforts to create an integrated community in New York City or, for that matter, anywhere in the United States.Rochdale was built by the United Housing Foundation Its president, Abraham Kazan, had been the major builder of low cost cooperative housing in New York City for decades His partner in many of these ventures was Robert Moses Their work together was a marriage of opposites Kazan s utopian anarchist strain of social idealism with its roots in the early twentieth century Jewish labor movement combined with Moses s hardheaded, no nonsense pragmatism.Peter Eisenstadt recounts the history of Rochdale Village s first years, from the controversies over its planning, to the civil rights demonstrations at its construction site in 1963, through the late 1970s, tracing the rise and fall of integration in the cooperative Today, although Rochdale is no longer integrated, it remains a successful and vibrant cooperative that is a testament to the ideals of its founders and the hard work of its residents Rochdale s problems were a microcosm of those of the city as a whole troubled schools, rising levels of crime, fallout from the disastrous teachers strike of 1968, and generally heightened racial tensions By the end of the 1970s few white families remained.Drawing on exhaustive archival research, extensive interviews with the planners and residents, and his own childhood experiences growing up in Rochdale Village, Eisenstadt offers an insightful and engaging look at what it was like to live in Rochdale and explores the community s place in the postwar history of America s cities and in the still unfinished quests for racial equality and affordable urban housing.

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    About “Peter Eisenstadt

    • Peter Eisenstadt

      Peter Eisenstadt Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Rochdale Village: Robert Moses, 6,000 Families, and New York City's Great Experiment in Integrated Housing book, this is one of the most wanted Peter Eisenstadt author readers around the world.

    127 thoughts on “Rochdale Village: Robert Moses, 6,000 Families, and New York City's Great Experiment in Integrated Housing

    • This book is about the political, historical, and organizational aspects of Rochdale. On that level, it was very interesting. The history of Rochdale Village is intertwined with that of the labor movement, NYC housing policies, and the expansion outward towards Long Island. Ours was one of the first families to move in, in December 1963. I wasn't alive yet, but my sister was a newborn and my parents used to make the trip from Sunnyside to stand outside the construction site and watch their new c [...]


    • An somewhat interesting book for a small group of people. As someone who lived in Rochdale from 1970-1973, I wanted to know more about the history of this development, and I was curious about what happened to the community after we moved. The book was a little repetative, and would have been more enjoyable if there were more interviews with residents, and less about the board and the developers. It might also have captured a larger audience.


    • I lived in Rochdale for 23 years; Peter was my next door neighbor and my parents are featured in the book (I'm quoted as well). Those caveats aside, this is an excellent history of a community and the people who lived in it and still feel a strong attachment to it, regardless of where they now live.


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