A People's History of the World: From the Stone Age to the New Millennium

A People s History of the World From the Stone Age to the New Millennium Chris Harman describes the shape and course of human history as a narrative of ordinary people forming and re forming complex societies in pursuit of common human goals Interacting with the forces of

  • Title: A People's History of the World: From the Stone Age to the New Millennium
  • Author: Chris Harman
  • ISBN: 9781844672387
  • Page: 344
  • Format: Paperback
  • Chris Harman describes the shape and course of human history as a narrative of ordinary people forming and re forming complex societies in pursuit of common human goals Interacting with the forces of technological change as well as the impact of powerful individuals and revolutionary ideas, these societies have engendered events familiar to every schoolchild from the empiChris Harman describes the shape and course of human history as a narrative of ordinary people forming and re forming complex societies in pursuit of common human goals Interacting with the forces of technological change as well as the impact of powerful individuals and revolutionary ideas, these societies have engendered events familiar to every schoolchild from the empires of antiquity to the world wars of the twentieth century.In a bravura conclusion, Chris Harman exposes the reductive complacency of contemporary capitalism, and asks, in a world riven as never before by suffering and inequality, why we imagine that it can or should survive much longer Ambitious, provocative and invigorating, A People s History of the World delivers a vital corrective to traditional history, as well as a powerful sense of the deep currents of humanity which surge beneath the froth of government.

    • ¼ A People's History of the World: From the Stone Age to the New Millennium || ✓ PDF Download by Ý Chris Harman
      344 Chris Harman
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      Posted by:Chris Harman
      Published :2019-09-02T22:00:19+00:00

    About “Chris Harman

    • Chris Harman

      British journalist and political activist for the Socialist Workers Party.Harmann was involved with activism against the Viet Nam war but became controversial for denouncing Ho Chi Minh for murdering the leader of the Vietnamese Trotskists Harman s work on May 1968 in France and other student and workers uprisings of the late 1960s, The Fire Last Time, was recommended by rock band Rage Against the Machine in their album sleeve notes for Evil Empire.

    947 thoughts on “A People's History of the World: From the Stone Age to the New Millennium

    • ***** Illusion of an Epoch ***** There's a serious data comparison to be made between this book and Howard ZinnsA Peoples History of The United Stateson . Below:A Peoples History of The United StatesRating details ·  147,743 Ratings  ·  4,411 ReviewsA Peoples History of the WorldRating details ·  1,278 Ratings  ·  77 ReviewsNow, for all arguments sake regarding data perception (one being that perhaps there are more Americans on than the rest of the world, and therefore are [...]


    • We didn't manage to get very far in my so-called World History class in ninth grade, like somehow we didn't get to Asia, or out of the medieval period. Like Howard Zinn's "People's History," I suspect that this tome is meant for people like me, who disenchanted by the long list of battles and kings they were forced to memorize by name in school, never developed a strong interest in what is called history. At least, that's why I picked up this book. Unlike Zinn's "People's History" though, this o [...]


    • Great introduction to the history of the world. Tries to fit most events into a Marxist context, explaining how the development of the "means of production" changed the course of the world at almost every juncture. A pretty good book to turn to if you are trying to place anchor some of these big ideas in actual history.One of the strengths of the book is that while it is heavy on "dialectical materialism" the author readily points out when other, non-economic forces were also in play. He also is [...]


    • It is almost impossible to review a book with such an unrivalled scope as this. Chris Harman present a history of the world, a social history documenting the struggles of people the world over from 3000BC right through to the new millennium. It is a beautiful and admirable volume, packed with interesting facts about the inherent fairness of humanity and our desire to work together to create a better society. It is genuinely a world history too, rather than focusing narrowly on Europe or our west [...]


    • I was inspired to read this book by the revelation of just how ignorant I was of world history pre-1895 (blame it on the cinematic foundations of my education). I was also intrigued with it following my recent reading of Zinn's history of the American people. And I must say, it proved a priceless source of information. I had, however, a lot of problems with the book, despite its undeniably splendid passages. For one thing, the very ambition of the project gives way to certain ludicrousies. How i [...]


    • The book is very valuable especially for those who want to learn from the history of people. I found that the book is rather a reference not a story of people who have lived on the earth. One can return to it if he/she wants to read about specific period or civilization. I enjoyed much of the information presented on the book :)Recommended for history readers :)


    • So I glanced at reviews and am already not surprised to find out that he is looking at this from a Marxist perspective (just from reading the introduction "BEFORE CLASS"). Anyway, I know so little about most of history that I figure anything I read will be new and educational, so it's okay that it has obvious bias (though it's nice to know up front). I will probably take some notes here on what I manage to read because I have no memory.1.) Introduction: "Before Class" -- Summary -- people haven' [...]


    • It's everything that you think it would be -- Zinn + The World. The prehistoric part is pretty naive and more than half of the book is dedicated to the industrial revolution forward. He's projecting Marxism onto a lot of societies where it's a very ill fit. He designed the book to be a textbook, but it's too reactionary to be a textbook -- he's assumed that the reader has this greater body of knowledge that (s)he might not have (especially if he or she is an undergrad).




    • A good read, but repetitive in places (I guess because it is trying to show history as a cycle of class struggles) and of course as it covers such a great breadth of human history it sacrifices some depth.Nonetheless an excellent and very educational read, I would challenge anyone to read it and not learn a lot if purely because of the breadth of the material.Some of the conclusion is eerily prescient where he warns of possible future conflicts and nationalist tensions in the next (apparently in [...]


    • When I was in school I feel I was taught the world history of Western "civilization". It was the history of wars, imperialism and capitalism as perceived through the eyes of European and American history writers. This book does include the history of African, Middle Eastern, Asian, Oriental and island nations. I liked what I learned about other parts of the world that were largely ignored in my education.If I was given a capitalist/imperialist account of history, this book was a socialist histor [...]


    • This is a remarkable tome to rival Zinn's, a history of exploitation and class struggle from the ancient kings who ruled by divine right to industrial international capitalism, whose rulers, owners and managers also basically rule by divine right. Thoroughly engrossing and highly recommended.


    • i remember this being excessively dogmatic in approaching "world" history from a Marxist-Leninist (Trotskyist) perspective. far too Euro-centric


    • “History is about the sequence of events that led to the lives we lead today. It is the story of how we came to be ourselves.”


    • Harman looks closely at class struggle since the birth of the cultural revolution. the title of the book is the shortest review of Harman's work. it can be recommended if anyone wants to study the history of the world according to the people struggle, class setbacks and changes within the social ranks.


    • This book was absolutely amazing. There are no other words to describe this amazing source of literature. The novel starts from the stone age and the development of civilization and then spirals its way up time all the way to the year 2,000 c.e. I found this book not only interesting historically (because I am history obsessed) but also just plain, old smart. The title explains it all, the novel carries one through history not in the old fashioned textbook way, but through the eyes of the people [...]


    • A great book, packed with information from historical events and politics all around the world, it starts with the societies before and post-class civilization. You will read mainly about the great powers of the world from Europe to Russia, Britain, the US and their empires and colonies around the globe. It speaks of the middle east in brief, basically summarized in few pages, but gives you the outline. It elaborates about the struggle of communism and capitalism and it's ripple effect throughou [...]


    • The title "History of the World" is no Mel Brooks gag: the author takes us from the earliest days of hunter-gatherers toward the world-burning events of the late 20th century. Eschewing a "great man" view of events, Harman instead analyzes human history from a class perspective, and the results are fascinating.Granted, covering all of this material in a single volume can sometimes be overwhelming, and one insurgency/revolt/ascension is in danger of running into another. However, the seminal even [...]


    • This is a unique book. A comprehensive history of humanity from the standpoint of the oppressed and exploited, not as victims but as heroes of revolutionary struggles with emancipatory potential. The book is much more than "history from below" though. It is also a refined application of the Marxist approach to history, setting the unfolding of events in the context of the interaction of humans with nature and among themselves as people make their own histories in conditions inherited from past d [...]


    • This book is phenomenal. I could not put it down. It definitely doesn't follow Howard Zinn's methodology of using ordinary people's views of historical events, but it certainly does give a sense of how ordinary people are affected by historical change. The text is exciting to read and gives one an expansive view of history. While a western perspective definitely dominates the text, ultimately it is a book that illustrates how events in one part of the world affect events in other parts of the wo [...]


    • First of all, this has nothing to do with "A people's history of the US". This is not a coherent study, and it is far from compelling.The first part, about pre-history is totally generic and boring. The same can be said about the period of the industrial revolution. Better time could be spent revising other episodes, and there are incomprehensible gaps, particularly the absense of the importance of the portuguese colonization.Furthermore, a marxist reading of history should be dynamic, something [...]


    • Anybody who attempts to write a review will fail miserably. The best thing that anyone can do is simply ask the reader of this review to purchase the book & get on with it. I say this should be on every reading bucket list. Simple english, easy to follow, nothing dramatic, facts presented as facts. If Livy or Herodotus were alive they would have been jealous of this book. Go ahead & start reading it


    • A Marxist analysis of the entire history of the world, Get's a little polemical around the late 1800s then turns into an apology piece in the 20th Century. Like the Marxist view of history, interesting and highly valuable but somewhat lacking in imagination and cross-application. No room for great actors or happenstance just class, class, class.


    • I had to read parts of this book throughout the year for AP World History.After I finished it, I BURNED IT. HA!Don't take AP World History, kids.Oh, and I put this on my 'Made Me Cry' shelf because it did, but not in a good way. I failed multiple quizzes due to my inability to absorb a single block of word vomit.


    • This book is outstanding! Much of what we know about domination, patriarchy, and oppression is simply not found in conventional histories of the world. This book, via an exhaustive overview of the archaeological and written record-sets the record straight-and it is supremly well-written.




    • The title of this book is misleading. It's not a People's history of the World so much as it's a history of class struggle, mostly in Europe and a little bit in America. Really, the book could be divided into two sections: the first half concerning the transition stages of world history - from the slave mode of production to the feudal mode, and thence from feudalism to capitalism - and the second half is a Euro-centric history of capitalism, from the point of view of those on the receiving end [...]


    • A People’s History of the WorldFrom the Stone Age to the New MillenniumAuthor Chris HarmanNarrated by Napoleon RyanPublication date Aug 29, 2017Running time 27 hrsCourtesy Tantor MediaI love history. I have loved it since childhood. I have favorite eras, like the Plantagenet and Tudor reigns of England. I lack an overall view of world history. How it all fits together. The non-European history and how it connects with the history I was taught. When I saw A People’s History of the World by Ch [...]


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