The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy

The Fragility of Goodness Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy This book is a study of ancient views about moral luck It examines the fundamental ethical problem that many of the valued constituents of a well lived life are vulnerable to factors outside a person

  • Title: The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy
  • Author: Martha C. Nussbaum
  • ISBN: 9780521794725
  • Page: 138
  • Format: Paperback
  • This book is a study of ancient views about moral luck It examines the fundamental ethical problem that many of the valued constituents of a well lived life are vulnerable to factors outside a person s control, and asks how this affects our appraisal of persons and their lives The Greeks made a profound contribution to these questions, yet neither the problems nor theThis book is a study of ancient views about moral luck It examines the fundamental ethical problem that many of the valued constituents of a well lived life are vulnerable to factors outside a person s control, and asks how this affects our appraisal of persons and their lives The Greeks made a profound contribution to these questions, yet neither the problems nor the Greek views of them have received the attention they deserve This updated edition contains a new preface.

    • ☆ The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy || õ PDF Download by ↠ Martha C. Nussbaum
      138 Martha C. Nussbaum
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      Published :2019-07-15T12:59:23+00:00

    About “Martha C. Nussbaum

    • Martha C. Nussbaum

      Professor Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago, appointed in the Philosophy Department, Law School, and Divinity School She is an Associate in the Classics Department and the Political Science Department, a Member of the Committee on Southern Asian Studies, and a Board Member of the Human Rights Program She is the founder and Coordinator of the Center for Comparative Constitutionalism.Martha Nussbaum received her BA from NYU and her MA and PhD from Harvard She has taught at Harvard, Brown, and Oxford Universities From 1986 to 1993, Ms Nussbaum was a research advisor at the World Institute for Development Economics Research, Helsinki, a part of the United Nations University She has chaired the Committee on International Cooperation and the Committee on the Status of Women of the American Philosophical Association, and currently chairs its new Committee for Public Philosophy She has been a member of the Association s National Board In 1999 2000 she was one of the three Presidents of the Association, delivering the Presidential Address in the Central Division Ms Nussbaum has been a member of the Council of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the Board of the American Council of Learned Societies She received the Brandeis Creative Arts Award in Non Fiction for 1990, and the PEN Spielvogel Diamondstein Award for the best collection of essays in 1991 Cultivating Humanity won the Ness Book Award of the Association of American Colleges and Universities in 1998, and the Grawemeyer Award in Education in 2002 Sex and Social Justice won the book award of the North American Society for Social Philosophy in 2000 Hiding From Humanity won the Association of American University Publishers Professional and Scholarly Book Award for Law in 2004 She has received honorary degrees from thirty seven colleges and universities in the U S Canada, Asia, and Europe, including Grinnell College, Williams College, The College of William and Mary, The University of St Andrews Scotland , the University of Edinburgh Scotland , Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Belgium , the University of Toronto, the Ecole Normale Sup rieure Paris , the New School University, the University of Haifa, Ohio State University, and Georgetown University She received the Grawemeyer Award in Education in 2002, the Barnard College Medal of Distinction in 2003, the Radcliffe Alumnae Recognition Award in 2007, and the Centennial Medal of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University in 2010 She is an Academician in the Academy of Finland In 2009 she won the A award from the German Social Science Research Council for WZB for her contributions to social system reform, and the American Philosophical Society s Henry M Phillips Prize in Jurisprudence.

    475 thoughts on “The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy

    • Oh for the days when I still adored and admired Martha Nussbaum. This wonderful book predates the "capabilities approach" for which she is now famous, and which I was recently forced to re-encounter in a context that thoroughly exposed its flaws. I was fuming about this recent Nussbaum run-in on the subway this morning, thinking of the very many blithe assumptions about the content of "the good" upon which the capabilities approach is based, and planning a scathing review (that'll teacher her!) [...]


    • Martha Nussbaum's genius for inductive thinking (starting with the specific and working toward the general) is apparent on virtually every page of this monumental work. It's so monumental I basically read it via the index, following her reasoning and skipping around as a page or passage caught my eye. Her chapter on Plato's *Symposium* is a most brilliant account of that dialogue. The conceptual links she welds together are so substantial that one can "visit" this book almost as a reference text [...]


    • As someone who has read quite a bit of later Nussbaum, finally getting to this, her first major book that I know of, was a treat. Most of the themes she takes up in her later works already make some appearance here: a defense of emotions and their cognitive bases, a positive normative view of human dependence, a belief in the philosophical contributions of literature; even her feminism and capabilities perspectives make a showing.


    • ---Read this and reviews of other classics in Western Philosophy on the History page of BestPhilosophyBooks (athinkPhilosophy Production).---There is this conundrum in moral philosophy that, even if you cultivate a good character and act always intent on doing the right thing, fate may intervene to throw some bad luck your way so that, what had been a good life begins to look like a terrible life. In short, doing the right thing is no guarantee that one will be rewarded with a good or easy life. [...]


    • I enjoyed this one. Professor Nussbaum has an amazing grasp of a phenomenally wide range of aspects of the central challenges of our lives.The Chapter 11 treatment of Aristotle's view of the dialectic between luck and rationality is very good and also relevant. The eudiamon life does require the resources that come to those with good fortune. At the same time planning and control, driven by rationality, are also required. If you are not experiencing eudaimonia it could be that one or both factor [...]


    • A few lines of thought expressed in this book have stuck with me. First, Nussbaum breathes new life in the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. She makes the compelling case that plays like Antigone, Agamemnon, the Seven against Thebes were not merely pieces of drama, produced for the amusement of the Athenian public, but were in fact also permeated by evaluations and conceptions of the good life. From the predicaments Agamemnon and Creon finds themselves in, there is much to learn a [...]


    • I've only read Ch. 8 - "Saving Aristotle's appearances,"but the book is worth checking out for that chapter alone. She does an excellent job of describing and justifying Aristotle's "ordinary language" method of philosophizing and distinguishing him from Wittgenstein.



    • Excellent book. Examines the role of luck in our ability to be a good person and lead a good life, through the perspectives of Greek tragedy, Plato, and Aristotle, comparing the three along the way.


    • Scholarship at its finest. In this impressive volume, Martha Nussbaum--one of the greatest living philosophers, and an incredibly generous person if my one meeting with her is any indicator--is doing many things. She is, for one, doing impressive exegetical work on Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides as well as on Greek philosophy (particularly, the works of Plato and Aristotle). She is also addressing a problem that has contemporary relevance, both in contemporary moral philosophy as well as our [...]


    • This is not an easy read but for those that are interested in Philosophy this book offers a lot of insights into the works of Socrates and Plato's Symposium .


    • Is someone lucky or blessed? The distance between survival and disaster is ceaselessly changing and most of us have absolutely no control over what happens. Why are we here and why do some prosper and other live lives of despair?


    • "if activities are the main thing in life, as we said, nobody who is makarios will ever become basely wretched. For he will never engage in hateful and base actions. We think that the really good and reasonable person will bear his luck with dignity and always do the finest thing possible given the circumstances, just as the good general will make the most warlike use of the army he has and the good shoemaker will make the best shoe he can out of the hide he is given -- and so on for all craftsm [...]


    • It was a well written book with good analysis, but it seemed to drag at certain points to me. I'm sure this would appeal to someone who is more interested in Greek philosophy than I am though. I can see her logic and follow her arguments well however they simply don't resonate with me as Nussbaum clearly loves Aristotle and I can take him or leave him.


    • This is a great text. Nussbaum does an incredible job of explaining the Aristotilean project and methodology. She then ties Aristotle's ethical worldview to tragedy to demonstrate the fundamental understanding in Greek life that the good/the good life is delicate, timebound and as dependent upon luck as right action. An Awesome text.


    • i've had this book for forever, and now i'm actually writing about plato and aristotle, and so i dug it out. it's turning out to be an essential and illuminating guide to these texts-- particularly the phaedrus.


    • a common reaction for readers of philosophy: "[The] natural response is that this is not how it feels to be in that situation. It does not feel like solving a puzzle, where all that is needed is to find the right answer."


    • I loved the content of this book, her arguments are well built and clear. I learned a lot. The only drawback is the writing style, Nussbaum uses many words to make points that could have been summarized.





    • Summer reading group. So far, not so good (poor textual interpretation of Plato, especially, but some of Aristotle as well).



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