Spurious Correlations

Spurious Correlations Spurious Correlations is the most fun you ll ever have with graphs BustleMilitary intelligence analyst and Harvard Law student Tyler Vigen illustrates the golden rule that correlation does not equal c

  • Title: Spurious Correlations
  • Author: Tyler Vigen
  • ISBN: 9780316339438
  • Page: 174
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Spurious Correlations is the most fun you ll ever have with graphs BustleMilitary intelligence analyst and Harvard Law student Tyler Vigen illustrates the golden rule that correlation does not equal causation through hilarious graphs inspired by his viral website.Is there a correlation between Nic Cage films and swimming pool accidents What about beef consumptio Spurious Correlations is the most fun you ll ever have with graphs BustleMilitary intelligence analyst and Harvard Law student Tyler Vigen illustrates the golden rule that correlation does not equal causation through hilarious graphs inspired by his viral website.Is there a correlation between Nic Cage films and swimming pool accidents What about beef consumption and people getting struck by lightning Absolutely not But that hasn t stopped millions of people from going to tylervigen and asking, Wait, what Vigen has designed software that scours enormous data sets to find unlikely statistical correlations He began pulling the funniest ones for his website and has since gained millions of views, hundreds of thousands of likes, and tons of media coverage Subversive and clever, Spurious Correlations is geek humor at its finest, nailing our obsession with data and conspiracy theory.

    Other spurious things The old version of this site Discover a correlation find new correlations Go to the next page of charts, and keep clicking next to get through all , View the sources of every statistic in the book Or for something totally different, here is a pet project When is the next time something cool will happen in space Spurious relationship Spurious correlation definition of spurious correlation spurious correlation a correlation between two variables e.g between the number of electric motors in the home and grades at school that does not result from any direct relation between them buying electric motors will not raise grades but from their relation to other variables Spurious Correlation investopedia Aug , Spurious Correlation, or spuriousness, is when two factors appear casually related but are not The appearance of a causal relationship is often due to Spurious Correlation Explained With Examples The word spurious has a Latin root it means false or illegitimate A correlation is a kind of association between two variables or events.

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      Published :2019-07-14T13:00:36+00:00

    About “Tyler Vigen

    • Tyler Vigen

      Tyler Vigen Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Spurious Correlations book, this is one of the most wanted Tyler Vigen author readers around the world.

    238 thoughts on “Spurious Correlations

    • I would just like to thank my hubby for buying this book for me on a whim <3. I had never heard it before but figured I would give it a try. I did not regret it. I had a blast reading this. Yes, it was a short book. It probably only took me a half hour to go through it, and that was me taking my time to examine each and every graph. But I really enjoyed the sick sense of humour and intellectual wickedness of Tyler Vigen, mixed with the well sourced facts and hilarious graphs. This book remind [...]



    • This is the kind of thing that's funnier in small doses, and as a book it's kind of overkill. The sections I liked best were cultural curiosities and famous folks because those were often the oddest, least related pairings (i.e. deaths caused by cataclysmic storm vs. greatest number of f*cks in a movie or Bruce Willis film appearances vs. people killed by an exploding boiler). I really liked the spurious correlations that appeared in The Best American Infographics 2015, and there were only about [...]


    • Short but entertaining. By all means, take the time to read the author's comments. It is also useful to expand the graphs and compare the scales for each item. There are often really huge differences in scale on the Y-axis. That reminded me of a class I took where we deconstructed papers to look for scaling errors, inadequate sample sizes, and assumptions which often drew conclusions which at least demanded non-parametric statistics. I enjoyed the book as light reading with some amusing correlat [...]


    • Funny and useless. Fine exercise of data dredging to find spurious correlations between things with nothing in common. Want to teach what correlations are and why correlation doesn't mean causation? Read some pages from the book.Put otherwise, enjoy what great computing power can do to your ignorant believes.


    • This is an entertaining book, but it is a book that carries with it a big point for those who are interested in aggregating data trends and taking advantage of the mass of data that is available in our contemporary age [1].  The subtitle of the book gives a truism that we would do well to remember, that correlation does not equal causation, and the book goes out to prove it.  The book is meant to be taken with a certain bit of humor about it, as the author demonstrates when he writes about how [...]


    • A nice coffee table book! Set it out and let visitors thumb through it and giggle. All while learning at the same time.The author has a website where you can go and search through many, many different strange correlations, but the book adds interesting comments on each graph.If possible, browse the Kindle version if that's the version you want. Kindle versions sometimes barf on books with extensive use of graphics.



    • So-so, some interesting bits of facts scattered around. The text for each comparison chart is not that funny though I feel that was a wasted opportunity to inject some humor and wit in there.


    • (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.)Military intelligence analyst and Harvard Law student Tyler Vigen illustrates the golden rule that "correlation does not equal causation" through hilarious graphs inspired by his viral website.Is there a correlation between Nic Cage films and swimming pool accidents? What about beef consumption and people getting struck by lightning? Absolutely not. But that hasn't stopped millions of people from going to tyle [...]


    • Correlation means a connection between two numbers, occurrences, parts, or things. In statistics, we have correlation coefficients, which measure how strong the connection is based on the data.Causation, on the other hand, implies that one thing makes another thing occur or happen, as in "cause and effect."From a legal standpoint, causation is important in criminal law and civil lawIn physics, causation is useful for explaining phenomena as well as modeling them. Acceleration, for example, can b [...]


    • This book contains many spurious correlations, yet they were not hilarious correlations, as promised. I love the premise of this book, because the very important truth that correlation does not equal causation doesn't always make it past the ice cream sales and drowning example in most Psych 101 or Statistics 101 classes. However, there wasn't enough interesting or varying material here to justify publishing an entire book. Many of the correlations showed simple linear trends going in the same d [...]


    • This collection of graphs that show random associations between statistics is a concept that works better in a blog or tumblr feed than a book. Examples include Ice Cream Consumption vs. Brad Pitt's Earnings and Law Books Published vs. Bicyclists Killed in Collision with Stationary Object. The most entertaining part was probably the headlines. The author makes a comment on each graph, generally some fact about one of the two things being compared, but often the comment isn't actually related to [...]


    • This was a very rapid read, one without much substance. Of course, lack of substance is pretty much the point. My estimate is that there were about fifty correlations, each with a double page spread that included a graph and sources for both sets of statistics. I'm glad I got this from the library rather than buying it. Some of the correlations were amusing enough to share with my husband as I read, but I don't remember any of them at this point except that they were all things that obviously di [...]


    • A fun book to page through, with silly facts and exactly what it says on the cover, graphs of spurious correlations. The best involve a hint of irony like undergraduate enrollment at US universities compared to deaths caused by falling televisions or philosophy books published versus the number of lawyers practicing in Washington state. I'd recommend this book for anyone looking for a little light, silly reading.


    • This was a great book. This book contains Data Dredging. If you don't know what data dredging is, that okay I didn't either. Data dredging is a technique used to find something that correlates with one variable by comparing it to hundreds of other variables. There are great examples charted by line graphs in the book. Like the number of computer science doctorates to the number of comic book sales. The correlation is 99.2%


    • Prepare for a lot of laughs and not much reading. Do storks really deliver babies? What's the correlation between babies and storks? Does correlation imply causation? Short intro to read and many very funny graphs to back up the real though absurd correlations And,despite all the fun, it makes a serious point.


    • Interesting book; good for data geeks like myself. I would have preferred humorous speculation about possible causalities for the correlations over the random "did you know?"-like facts presented with each graph, but there you have it.


    • This was a fun read. It's the kind of book that you share with a group instead of just reading by yourself. This is entirely my opinion, though.


    • Interesting but not really worth the timeCan read it in about 15 mins. Some interesting charts but no knowledge or useful information. Nothing against the book just save your money


    • I enjoyed this better as a blog. As a collection, there were just too many, and too many that weren't very funny correlations. I do really enjoy relating the unrelatable through charts, though.




    • Provided a few laughs, for sure. I appreciated that in addition to the "spurious correlations the author provided some real data on the related topics.



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