The Girl Who Loved Camellias: The Life and Legend of Marie Duplessis

The Girl Who Loved Camellias The Life and Legend of Marie Duplessis The little known riveting story of the most famous courtesan of her time muse and mistress of Alexandre Dumas fils and Franz Liszt the inspiration for Dumas s The Lady of the Camellias and Verdi s L

  • Title: The Girl Who Loved Camellias: The Life and Legend of Marie Duplessis
  • Author: Julie Kavanagh
  • ISBN: 9780307270795
  • Page: 303
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The little known, riveting story of the most famous courtesan of her time muse and mistress of Alexandre Dumas fils and Franz Liszt, the inspiration for Dumas s The Lady of the Camellias and Verdi s La Traviata, one of the most sought after, adored women of 1840s Paris.Born in 1824 in Normandy, Marie Duplessis fled her brutal peasant father who forced her to live with aThe little known, riveting story of the most famous courtesan of her time muse and mistress of Alexandre Dumas fils and Franz Liszt, the inspiration for Dumas s The Lady of the Camellias and Verdi s La Traviata, one of the most sought after, adored women of 1840s Paris.Born in 1824 in Normandy, Marie Duplessis fled her brutal peasant father who forced her to live with a man many years her senior Julie Kavanagh traces Marie s reinvention in Paris at sixteen as shop girl, kept woman, and finally, as grand courtesan with the clothes, apartment, coach and horses that an aristocratic woman of the time would have had Tall, willowy, with dramatic dark hair, Marie acquired an aristocratic mien, but coupled with a singular modesty and grace, she was an irresistible figure to men and women alike Kanavagh brings her to life on the page against a brilliantly evoked background of 1840s Paris the theater and opera, the best tables at the caf s frequented by society figures, theater directors, writers, artists and Marie, only nineteen, at the center of it all Four years later, at twenty three, she would be dead of tuberculosis.

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    • Best Download [Julie Kavanagh] ☆ The Girl Who Loved Camellias: The Life and Legend of Marie Duplessis || [Psychology Book] PDF ✓
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    133 thoughts on “The Girl Who Loved Camellias: The Life and Legend of Marie Duplessis

    • I saw this randomly in a bookstore and was abruptly consumed with the desire to read it immediately. Spoiler: it wasn't worth it. Marie Duplessis was a famous courtesan in 1840s Paris; La Dame aux Camélias by Dumas fils is a barely fictionalized version of her life, which then went on to inspire a play, the opera La Traviata, multiple ballets, an abundance of movies (including, to some extent, Moulin Rouge and Love Story), and even Tsubaki-hime in Yami no Matsuei. This could be a fascinating to [...]


    • As far as I know this is the "only" full-length English language biography of Marie Duplessis, a name that few Americans would recognize. The author herself mentions her need to study French in order to read what other writers had to say about Marie, including several who met her. The problem is that few of her letters survive and she kept no journals or diaries that anyone is aware of, so what we know about Marie is always based on how others saw her and remembered her.In her lifetime, she was [...]


    • The true story of a famous courtesan who was with both father and son Dumas'. She was the inspiration for the opera Camelle.


    • There is a lot of myth, hyperbole and speculation about the woman who was the inspiration for Dumas, Verdi and at least three movies. The author attempts to find the truth, as much as it exists, about the life of Alphonsine Plessis. Her main source is the biography by Alphonsine's devoted friend Romain Vienne and she uses letters and official documents to give a chronological outline. Newspaper accounts give some detail but also contains a lot of gossip and the credibility is questioned. The rea [...]


    • This is a lovely biography of Marie Duplessis, the inspiration for La Traviata and many other works. It's a fairly basic account - mostly her childhood, her numerous lovers, and her extravagant spending - with very little exploration of the psychology behind this fascinating woman. Granted, she only lived until 23, so there isn't much history to relate, but I expected a bit more from this book than it gave me.


    • Coming up:Come Hear The Story of Marie Duplessis, the Real-Life Inspiration Behind Camille and Moulin Rouge!June 24: 7:00PM – 8:00PMstrandbooks/event/even


    • Would have given 2.5 stars. Good and interesting subject without enough original-source material -- forcing the author to speculate much too much.


    • La Traviata was the first opera I saw back in high school and maybe that is why it is one of my favorites. After seeing the Met Opera live in HD version recently, I decided to learn a bit more about the real Violetta, Marie du Plessis. The real woman was just as flawed, conflicted, lovely, charming and exquisitely dressed as one would imagine. I think I would have loved her as so many Parisians did and grieved for her early death from tuberculosis at age 23. I see her as an person famous for bei [...]


    • Marie Duplessis lived for 24 years in the early-1800's (the timeframe of Les Misérables). She grew up abandoned, hungry, exploited, uneducated, amoral. She could do an honest day's work but would do anything for anything in the streets if it paid better. Not exactly a shining heroine from history, her sad story might be a shrill fable for the young and female to adhere to social norms. How wonderful it is, then, that Julie Kavanagh has uncovered so much more about Duplessis than the stark trage [...]


    • "The little known, riveting story of the most famous courtesan of her time: muse and mistress of Alexandre Dumas fils and Franz Liszt, the inspiration for Dumas's The Lady of the Camellias and Verdi's La Traviata, one of the most sought after, adored women of 1840s Paris. Born in 1824 in Normandy, Marie Duplessis fled her brutal peasant father (who forced her to live with a man many years her senior). Julie Kavanagh traces Marie's reinvention in Paris at sixteen: as shop girl, kept woman, and fi [...]


    • I first heard of Marie Duplessis because of my love of opera. She was the inspiration for Dumas’s The Lady of the Camellias, which was the inspiration for my favourite opera of all time, La Traviata. After watching an amazing version of La Traviata with Anna Moffo in the lead role, I wondered how close her interpretation was to the real Marie Duplessis. Then I began to wonder who Marie Duplessis the person was, not just the character writers, painters and musicians have made her into over the [...]


    • "Per Alphonsine fu il momento decisivo del suo arrivo nella metropoli: la prima occasione in cui ebbe una prova tangibile dei lussi che la sua bellezza poteva comprare.""La ragazza delle camelie" è la vera storia di Alphonsine Plessis (in arte Marie Duplessis), la donna che ha inspirato Alexandre Dumas figlio nel famosissimo romanzo "La signora delle camelie", in questa biografia troviamo continui richiami della vita reale di questa donna che si trovano nell'opera del famoso scrittore, perché [...]


    • This is a great treatment of the life of Marie Duplessis. The writing is very readable and the author gives the right amount of detail to keep the story moving. Marie Duplessis led a truly extraordinary life. It seems that every man who met her was mesmerized by her beauty, which consequently, despite rigid social rules, enabled her to penetrate the circles of writers, such as Alexander Dumas (both father and son), musicians (like Liszt), and the elite and aristocratic through deliberate design, [...]


    • Marie Duplessis arrived in Paris a penniless, unschooled young teenager. But by the time she was 19, she had conquered the city. A natural beauty with a talent for seduction, it didn’t take long for Duplessis to quickly figure out how to augment her sensual features with aristocratic fashions and manners. She was soon mingling with some of the greatest artists and writers of her time. Among her admirers were pianist and composer Franz Lizst and Alexandre Dumas fils, the son of the famous autho [...]


    • Oh, what to do with this one…On the side of a three-star read, there just wasn’t a lot of “meat” here as far as details of Marie Duplessis. On the side of a four-star read – there just isn’t a lot of material available and yet, this is a real woman who was a demimondaine in 1840’s Paris who inspired an absurd amount of our now treasured art works. Hints of Marie’s life story gave us La Dame aux Camélias by Dumas fils, which inspired a number of plays, which in turn inspired Verd [...]


    • The Girl Who Loved Camellias is a dense 240 pages. It is the story of Marie Duplessis, whose biography was lost to history but endured through popular legend, multiple novels, dozens of ballets, and eventually opera and film. Her short, intense life is more interesting than even the novels would suggest(though much of this is drawn from those works). Born one Alphonsine Plessis, she dubbed herself Marie du Plessis, crafting a myth, aristocratic bearing and surname, complete with designing her ow [...]


    • Oh my, complications of the demimonde! What research to put this together. It is a difficult read. It has complexity to association and numbers of personalities within this story- BIG TIME. Having to pull all my old French out of my head was no easy task either, let me tell you. This will not be a 4 star for everyone. For me, it was nearly a 5. Historically and also how Julie Kavanagh starts this non-fiction with the listings of all the chronological plays, operas, movies and other stories and m [...]


    • The subject of this biography, Marie du Plessis, is an elusive one (even her name is unstable). On the one hand, she was a renowned courtesan of her day (early 19th-century France), but her background was obscure and her profession required her to play many parts. The author does a good job of presenting her position in society (though this could have been filled out a bit more, particularly where the "demimonde" met the underworld and the world of the respectably obscure working classes). The a [...]


    • The book is about the great French courtesan Marie Duplessis was muse to Alexandre Dumas fils and Franz Litz, and via Dumas, Verdi's inspiration for "La Traviata." Fleeing a dreadful childhood in Normandy, Duplessis bounced from job to job--maid, laundress, apprentice at an umbrella shop--before arriving in Paris, where she found the work that suited her best. While her profession alienated from the women of society, her natural glamor and charm made her irresistible to men. Tracing Duplessis's [...]


    • Beautifully done: Julie Kavanagh carefully separates fact from fiction and indicates where informed speculation takes the place of what can be known from surviving documents. From the technical point of view, I also liked the way the publisher had dispensed with superscript endnote numbers and arranged them by page and short quotation at the back.My only complaint is that there isn't a list of dramatis personae to help the reader keep track of the major characters who crossed Marie's path. Using [...]


    • I’m not quite sure what compelled me to pick up this book. It tells the story of Marie Duplessis, one of the 19th century’s most well known courtesans from her difficult upbringing to her rise among the Paris elite. Made famous by her beauty, Duplessis’ story is much better known through the novel, play and opera that made her a cultural icon.Read full review: mybookbagblog.wordpress/2


    • You know that feeling you get when you go to a concert of a band whose music you're not overly familiar with? Well, that's how I felt when I read this book. It was interesting and well structured, but I have no way of knowing how accurate the research is. Not that I would really know, anyway, but I have no previous background information on this woman. Fascinating stuff, though. But too brief. Which is probably as it should be, as she was only 23 when she died, but still.


    • Didn't actually finish - victim of library return date. But I was kind of okay with that because I'd had about enough. I got kind of annoyed with the continuous portrayal of Marie as a fallen-woman-subject-to-fate. Maybe that was the legend, but was the reality? And if it was the "reality," whose reality is that based on? Eh. I don't know.


    • This was such interesting content, a good and easy read. Sometimes I would get the names confused so you have to really follow all the works being explored and the different namesfor the same character.


    • It is an interesting story, but not written with a smooth flow, it felt choppy with all the names and maybe far too many details of streets,people and places that you lost the feeling of a well written novel


    • I enjoyed this biography of a little-known courtesan in 1840s Paris. I thought that some of the source material must have been sparse, since the book glossed over large chunks of time. However, I did enjoy the glimpse into life in an era that I don't know much about.


    • I loved it! Intriguing story about a courtesan in Paris. The author obviously did an amazing amount of research and the story is heartbreaking and, in an odd way, inspiring. I can feel the pull to read more about the time period and the characters that were discussed in the book.


    • Little known biography of the most famous courtesan of 1840s Paris. "Moulin Rouge" is loosely based on Marie Duplessis, a courtesan who dies of consumption at the age of 23. Dumas fils wrote of her in Camille, which I highly recommend.


    • I had hoped that I had stumbled upon a second "Memoirs of a Geisha" - Poverty stricken girl, in a milieu so alien to ours that it might as well be on Mars, uses her beauty and her body to reach into the highest level of society. It wasn't.


    • Kavanagh shows extensive research on the life of Marie Duplessis, the basis for the literary character Camille, the consumptive courtesan of Dumas fils fame. The information is generally interesting, but the book never seems to go beyond an academic exercise.


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